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Doctoral Courses

Course name Credits Details Term
OPM 801 Optimization and Heuristics 8 ECTS

For more information on the dates and content of the courses please go to the CDSB website, Area Operations Management.

Fall term
OPM 910 Operations & Information Systems Research Seminar 6 ECTS

The schedule is presented below.

Fall term and Spring term
OPM 918 Business Analytics: Models, Methods, Managerial Insights 8 ECTS

For more information on the dates and content of the courses please go to the CDSB website, Area Operations Management.

Spring term

OPM 910 CDSB Operations & Information Systems Seminar

The Center for Doctoral Studies in Business (CDSB) represents the postgraduate training pillar of the University of Mannheim Business School. It is part of the Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) founded in 2006. The graduate school provides doctoral training in empirical and quantitative methods and their application to business, economics, and the social sciences.

As a way to motivate young researchers and to approach them with up-to-date research projects, the CDSB organizes the Operation & Information Systems Track Seminar every semester in cooperation with the Areas of Operations and Information Systems. For this purpose, visiting researchers present their latest research and discuss their ideas with faculty members and students.

The schedule is presented below.

Date

Chair

Location

Speaker and title

Wed,
20.03.2019
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
Prof. Schön O 148

Prof. Dr. Sebastian Spaeth, Universität Hamburg, Germany

Title
Cognition, emotion and perceived values in crowdfunding decision making process

Abstract
Current research on crowdfunding treats different crowdfunding forms as identical, and focuses on finding generic success factors in crowdfunding. We argue that funding decisions are contingent on the vastly different types of crowdfunding and that these require more attention. Against the backdrop of neuroscience and consumption value theory, we shed more light on crowdfunders' decision making. Using a factorial survey with 309 crowdfunding backers we find that decision making differs among equity, loan and presales crowdfunding types. In equity crowdfunding, cognitive values (perceived financial and informational benefits) play a dominant role. In contrast, loan and presales funding decisions are subject to both cognitive and affective factors (such as emotional value). In presales, affective values dominated, whereas financial value did not play a significant role. Loan-based forms shared characteristics with both extremes, taking some middle ground. Interestingly enough, neither novelty, nor aesthetics nor social value was found to be significant in any of the three crowdfunding types investigated.

Wed,
03.04.2019
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
Prof. Höhle O 148 Dr. Manuel Wiesche, Technischen Universität München, Germany

Title
How does turnover spread? The influence of IT professionals’ turnover on their organizational network

Abstract

This paper analyzes the spread of turnover in the social network of IT professionals, which has an influence on the timing of collective turnover. Furthermore, we analyze whether turnover spreads in the direct as well as in indirect professional social network. Based on a large human-resource data set from an IT company, we first use a diffusion process for simulating the spread of turnover and then employ survival analysis to analyze its influence. We find that turnover of an IT professional increases the probability of further turnover. Furthermore, we find that both the direct and the indirect network are influenced. This study makes two key contributions. First, we show that turnover spreads within the social network of IT professionals, which has already been suggested by studies in general turnover research, but it remained unclear whether this results are transferable to the IT domain. Second, we show that the turnover of an IT professional influences the direct social network as well as the indirect social network. This is the first IT turnover study that analyzes the influence of turnover on other IT professionals in the social network.

Wed,
22.05.2019
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

Prof. Schön

O 148

Dr. Anran Li, London School of Economics, United Kingdom

Title
On Bias in Social Learning and Consumer Choice

Abstract
Reviews for products and services, written by consumers and users, have become an influential input to the purchase decision. For many service businesses they have also become part of the performance review for managers with rewards tied to improvement in the aggregate rating. It is therefore of great importance to understand how much the public ratings reflect true quality of the product or service. Many empirical papers have documented a bias in the aggregate rating arising from various sources — both consumers’ self-selection bias in reporting reviews, as well as potential customers’ bounded rationality in evaluating previous reviews. While there is a vast empirical literature, theoretical models that try to isolate and explain the ratings bias are relatively few, and most are based on rational Bayesian learning on the part of consumers. However, writing a review requires some effort (even if firms try to make it as painless as possible) and it seems unlikely – as well documented and tested in the behavioral economics field – that consumers make the effort to do a proper Bayesian update of their beliefs before making purchases. In this paper we investigate the nature of the self-selection bias from two sources (i) acquisition bias, i.e., consumers confound ex-ante innate preferences for a product or service with ex-post experience and are unable or unwilling to separate the two, and (ii) under-reporting bias, i.e., consumers with extreme positive (or negative) ratings are more likely to write reviews than consumers with moderate product ratings. We develop a parsimonious dynamic choice model for consumer purchase decisions and show that both sources of self-selection bias lead to an upward bias. We focus on and quantify the acquisition bias, which is shown to make the tastes of consumers look more “heterogeneous”, benefiting niche products and hurting popular products in terms of the choice probability. We investigate how this affects the firms’ assortment and pricing decisions on an online platform.