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IS 614: Corporate Knowledge Management

Lerninhalte
Companies have realized that the knowledge of their professionals is a decisive factor in competition. Firms are able to differentiate against their competitors through superior knowledge in the long term. This lecture deals with the question of how the creation acquisition, transfer, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge can be supported with the information technology and where the limits of such efforts are. It also addresses how to design information technology to support different knowledge processes.

Lern- und Qualifikations­ziele
Course participants will be able to:

  • explain the role and importance of knowledge for organizations
  • understand and explain the processes of knowledge management (KM)
  • describe and evaluate the possibilities to support the different knowledge processes through information technology
  • understand and evaluate different design principles of KM systems
  • evaluate and apply organizational and technological mechanisms that ensure the use of KM systems

Notwendige Voraussetzungen
IS 554 (only applying to MAKUWI-students)

Inhaltliche Voraussetzungen

LehreSelbststudium
Vorlesung2 SWS15 SWS
ECTS6
SpracheEnglisch
Prüfungs­form und -umfangWritten exam (60 min.), optional case study (20%)
Zulassungs­beschränktNein
Informationen zur Anmeldung
Geprüft durch
Durchführende Lehr­kraft
Dr. Ekaterina Jussupow
Dr. Ekaterina Jussupow, Desiree Zercher
AngebotsturnusHerbst-/Wintersemester
Dauer des Moduls 1 Semester
VerwendbarkeitM.Sc. MMM, M.Sc. WiPäd, M.Sc. VWL, M.Sc. Wirt. Inf., MAKUWI
Vorleistungen
Programm­spezifische KompetenzzieleCG 1
Benotung Ja
Literatur
  • Alavi, M. and Leidner, D. (2001). Review: Knowledge management and knowledge management systems: Conceptual foundations and research issues. MIS Quarterly, 107-136.
  • Becerra-Fernandez, I. and Sabherwal, R. (2010). Knowledge management: Challenges, solutions, and technologies. M.E. Sharpe, New York, NY.
  • Becerra-Fernandez, I. and Sabherwal, R. (2001). Organizational knowledge management: A contingency perspective. Journal of Management Information Systems, 18(1), 23-55.
  • Dennis, A. and Vessey, I. (2005). Three knowledge management strategies: Knowledge hierarchies, knowledge markets, and knowledge communities. MIS Quarterly Executive, 4(4), 399-412.
  • Fan, W., Wallace, L., Rich, S., and Zhang, Z. (2006). Tapping the power of text mining. Communications of the ACM, 49(9), 82.
  • Hansen, M., Nohria, N., and Tierney, T. (999). What’s your strategy for managing knowledge? Knowledge Management: Critical Perspectives on Business and Management, 77(2), 322.
  • Kankanhalli, A., Tan, B., and Wei, K. (2005). Contributing knowledge to electronic repositories: An empirical investigation. Management Information Systems Quarterly, 29(1), 7.
  • Kudaravalli, S., Faraj, S., and Johnson, S. (2017). A configural approach to coordinating expertise in software development teams. MIS Quarterly, 41(1), 43-64.
  • Ko, D.-G., Kirsch, J., and King, W. (2005). Antecedents of knowledge transfer from consultants to clients in enterprise system implementations. MIS Quarterly, 29(1), 59-85.
  • Nevo, D. and Wand, Y. (2005). Organizational memory information systems: a transactive memory approach. Decision Support Systems, 39(4), 549-562.
  • Nonaka, I. and Takeuchi, H. (1995). The knowledge-creating company: How Japanese companies create the dynamics of innovation, Oxford University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Zhang, X. (2017). Knowledge Management System Use and Job Performance: A multilevel contingency model, MIS Quarterly, 41(3), 811-840.
Gliederung
  • Knowledge creation
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Knowledge storage and retrieval
  • Designing knowledge management systems
  • The use of knowledge management systems
  • Case study